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Science News

American Science News for 19 Apr 2018

Researchers find new way ofResearchers have developed a new way to improve our knowledge of the Big Bang by measuring radiation from its afterglow, called the cosmic microwave background radiation. The new results predict the... maximum bandwidth of the universe, which is the maximum speed at which any change can occur in the universe.
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Should Quantum Anomalies Make Us Rethink Reality?

Scientific American - 19 Apr 2018 13:00
Should Quantum Anomalies MakeInexplicablelab results may be telling us we’re on the cusp of a new scientific paradigm --
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Using optogenetics, researchers have identified a causal association between dopamine and avoidance behavior linked to pain and fear.
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A new computer algorithm may help to identify sexual predators who target children in chatrooms. The algorithm, dubbed CATT, can identify language differences and self-disclosure in conversations to... provide a risk assessment of potential predators, researchers report.
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Machine Learning System Processes Sounds Like Humans Do

Neuroscience News - 19 Apr 2018 20:01
Researchers have developed a deep neural network that can replicate the way in which humans process and categorize sounds.
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Concussion May Increase Parkinson's Risk

Neuroscience News - 19 Apr 2018 19:37
A new study reveals veterans who suffered a concussion are at a 56% increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease.
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Male insects have been genetically engineered to climax on command, and it seems they get a real buzz out of it - perhaps even a fly orgasm
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Humans Probably PracticedAbout 5,000 years ago, humans used crude stone tools to puncture a hole in a cow's head, making it the earliest known instance of skull surgery in an animal.
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Some of the last great wildernesses are being considered as likely candidates for geoengineering. It's a sad reflection of climate failings, says Olive Heffernan
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Is Sparkling Water As Healthy As Regular Water?

Live Science - 19 Apr 2018 18:03
Is Sparkling Water As HealthySo refreshing. But is it hydrating?
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Nazi Germany's Most High-TechThe deadly quiet, superfast U-boat was sunk by an Allied aerial assault on May 6, 1945.
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Robot Autonomously Assembles IKEA Chair

Neuroscience News - 19 Apr 2018 17:37
A new robotics system has succeeded where so many humans fail; in autonomously assembling an IKEA chair without interruption.
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Researchers have investigated Hans Asperger's Nazi era publications and have revealed he actively cooperated with the Nazi's euthanasia program. The Kinder-Euthanasie (child euthanasia) program... resulted in the murder of thousands of physically and mentally disabled children under Nazi rule.
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How Thought Leadership Inspires Action With Ideas

Singularity Hub - 19 Apr 2018 17:00
How Thought LeadershipDenise Brosseau believes that leading in today's complicated world requires clarity of intention, voice, and focus. In essence, it requires thought leadership. In Denise's view, thought leadership... isn't just about being famous or being known, it's about getting your ideas out to the world in a way that promotes engagement, connection, and action. And Denise […]
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Atoms may hum a tune fromResearchers playing with a cloud of ultracold atoms uncovered behavior that bears a striking resemblance to the universe in microcosm. Their work, which forges new connections between atomic physics... and the sudden expansion of the early universe, was published April 19 in Physical Review X and featured in Physics.
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Fossil tracks in the Alps helpTHAT the dinosaurs went out with a bang is well known. About 66m years ago a large space rock hit what is now southern Mexico. As a consequence, and with the assistance of some enormous volcanic... eruptions on the other side of the planet, the terrible lizards were consigned to history. That left the world open for the rise of mammals. What is less well known is that the dinosaurs themselves rose in circumstances similar to those that felled them. The animals' long reign through the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods was enabled by another, albeit smaller, period of mass extinction, which happened between 234m and 232m years ago during the Triassic period. This extinction is thought to have been caused by a period of unstable climate called the Carnian Pluvial Episode (CPE), in which the...
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Build a better bog roll

The Economist - 19 Apr 2018 16:48
Build a better bog rollA REPORT published last year by Water UK, an industry body, said that more than 90% of sewer-pipe blockages in Britain were caused by "non-flushable wipes". Accumulations of these can clog up pumps.... Worse, when they are gathered together by the adhesive power of kitchen grease, they can form giant "fatbergs" that choke the passage of effluent. Some of the wipes in question were for cleaning surfaces or removing cosmetics. Most of those that could be identified, though, were for wiping babies' bottoms. And probably not only those of babies. As people grow richer, they can afford more comfortable means of personal hygiene, so many adult nether regions are probably being tended to in this way as well. Ordinary toilet paper is not a problem for sewers. It disintegrates rapidly, after being...
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Stronger People Have Healthier Brains

Neuroscience News - 19 Apr 2018 16:28
A new study reports a strong hand grip is correlated with better visual memory and reaction times in people with psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia.
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Diamond-like carbon is formedResearchers at Aalto University and Cambridge University have made a significant breakthrough in computational science by combining atomic-level modeling and machine learning. For the first time, the... method has been used to realistically model how an amorphous material is formed at the atomic level: that is, a material that does not have a regular crystalline structure. The approach is expected to have impact on the research of many other materials.
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Researchers use diamondIt's not often that you see 50-year-old equipment in a modern physics laboratory, let alone find it at the center of cutting-edge research. But then, most such labs aren't run by Ronald Walsworth.
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Blowflies repeatedly blow bubbles of saliva, which look like brown bubble gum - and it turns out this odd behaviour helps them keep cool
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Family doctors who offer homeopathy - not recommended by the NHS - are also more likely to practice other bad habits such as the overuse of antibiotics
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Why Is a Train Filled withA train filled with smelly human excrement from New York City has been stranded in a small Alabama town for two months, according to news sources.
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Electromagnetic wizardry:An international research team including scientists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and ITMO University has proposed a way to increase the efficiency of wireless power transfer... over long distances and tested it with numerical simulations and experiments. To achieve this, they beamed power between two antennas, one of which was excited with a back-propagating signal of specific amplitude and phase. The study is detailed in a paper published in Physical Review Letters and briefly reported in the American Physical Society journal Physics.
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Ultrafast electron oscillationCollaborative research team of Prof. Jun Takeda and Associate Prof. Ikufumi Katayama in the laboratory of Yokohama National University (YNU) and Nippon Telegraph and Telephone (NTT) have reported... petahertz electron oscillation. The periodic electron oscillations of 667-383 attoseconds (10-18 of a second) is the fastest that has ever been measured in direct time-dependent spectroscopy in solid-state material.
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